Question on the Natto Bacteria

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Question on the Natto Bacteria

Postby decompluse on Wed Nov 16, 2016 9:22 pm

Greetings everyone,

I'm new to this forum, but not new to fermenting. Now I've been doing sourdough rye bread for like 2 years. And would like to try to advance into some other food as well. Probably going into Natto next.

Just I really want to ask a question about Natto, and I don't seem to find anyone ever talk about this on this forum or google. If anyone ever do Natto please let me know ;)

The question is, can the natto bacteria Bacillus subtilis, or whatever you want to call, be use for fermenting other legume or grains? like possible something like Bacillus subtilis sourdough?

I know my sourdough from wild, it can works on beans, but can the Natto-kin be use on grain? It would be nice to know that if it's work, I might just use that instead, and hope my rye bread can also have vitamin K2.

Anyone ever done something like this?
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Re: Question on the Natto Bacteria

Postby Kal on Tue Dec 20, 2016 3:17 pm

Just to add some diversity Here is a patented recipe :lol: for barley and yam soybean natto.

Bacillus subtilis var. natto is actually from the hay of rice plants, it would be worth a shot to try it on cooked brown rice or barley.
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Re: Question on the Natto Bacteria

Postby bacteriaguy on Sat May 27, 2017 10:23 am

Sourdough starter is a yeast not a bacteria.

If you are only interested in the k2 and the enzymes, and aren't fussy about the taste and the texture, try making a yogurt with just Bacillus subtilis added to it. It will still be full of Bacillus subtilis, k2, and enzymes like nattokinase. I eat some of this yogurt daily. it's not tasty, and it does separate into curds and whey, but I just stir them together and put them in a smoothie.

Method: Either use powdered milk and bottled water (to have a sterile milk with no competing bacteria) or boil some ordinary milk briefly to kill other bacteria. Add the milk and Bacillus to a sterilized glass jar with a lid and place it in a yogurt maker. The first batch (if you are using the powdered spore starter) will take over 24 hours to separate into curds and whey. If you are using a tablespoon of whey from your last batch of Bacillus subtilis yogurt, it will separate into curds and whey in about 10 to 12 hours. Sometimes it will separate even faster, especially during the summer months.

Unfortunately to make the velvety smooth texture of ordinary yogurts you would need other bacteria (S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus) which would compete with Bacillus subtilis and weaken it. You could stir some of your natto yogurt into regular yogurt and eat it that way. But save back some pure mother culture for the next batch.
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Re: Question on the Natto Bacteria

Postby Christopher Weeks on Tue May 30, 2017 8:19 am

(Sourdough starter is a complex ecosystem of microorganisms including lactobacilli, wild yeasts, etc.)
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Re: Question on the Natto Bacteria

Postby bacteriaguy on Tue May 30, 2017 7:29 pm

Oh, I wasn't aware of that.

I thought it was just wild yeast.

But I doubt that Bacillus subtilis would compete well with yeast and other bacteria, so the levels of resulting k2 and nattokinase would be quite low.
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Re: Question on the Natto Bacteria

Postby Christopher Weeks on Wed May 31, 2017 2:18 pm

Yeah, I wanted to correct you, just so that the right understanding was 'out there' but I realized it wasn't exactly germane.
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